New Ruger GP-100 .22 With Speedloader Set Up - Gun Hub
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Old 10-26-2016, 05:23 AM   #1
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New Ruger GP-100 .22 With Speedloader Set Up

Yesterday I picked up a new speedloader set up from Speed Beez, for my new Ruger GP-100, 10 shot .22 revolver. This is a really nice, well built speedloader system for this revolver. It comes in a nice carrying case that contains an O-Ring seal, much like the Pelican cases do, to prevent any water or moisture from entering the case.

It has holes to contain 100 rounds of .22 ammunition, along with a cut out in the center to contain the speedloader itself. The actual speedloader is of very high quality. The center section is machined from a solid piece of Aluminum on a live tool CNC lathe, that is finished by an Anodizing process in a gold color. The lower section that holds the ammunition is cut from black Delrin. The unit is held together by a single hardened and ground Allen Head Stripper Bolt that also holds the spring that releases the rounds. The loading block that contains the rounds is removable, if you care to separate it from the case while you're using it.

You simply place the loader over the group of 10 rounds. Then push down on the black Delrin piece until it snaps over the rim of the rounds. You then place the rounds into the cylinder of the gun, and press the gold anodized top piece, and it dumps all 10 rounds into the chambers instantly. A really nice, fast, foolproof system. With this set up you can easily maintain a shooting pace that will exceed that of a semi auto. Unless of course you happen to have 10, 10 round magazines all loaded up and ready to go.

For a 10 round .22 revolver this is really a nice thing to have. .22 rounds are small, and easy to fumble with while trying to load 10 of them into the cylinder. This makes the whole loading sequence fast and effortless. Speed Beez is mail order operation right here in Phoenix. I called to see if I could just drive over and pick one up. The owner was there, and explained how they manufacture and assemble them. It's a quality piece that comes in a variety of models, configurations, and calibers. If anyone is interested, this is their website, and a few quick pictures of the GP-100, along with the loader, and with the box and loading block that comes with it. It's really a nice edition to the Ruger GP-100.

https://www.speedbeez.com/product-ca...speed-loaders/











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Old 10-26-2016, 01:15 PM   #2
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You're probably going to find that the speedloader for a .22 revolver is only good for the first reload after a cleaning and the firing of one cylinder, if that. .22 lube, lead, and powder build up in the chambers so fast, and the ammo is so light, that after that, the rounds will only drop in halfway, if that. Then you have to go around and push every round into its chamber with your thumb anyway. After trying speedloaders with two S&W K-22s and a couple of Diamondbacks, I decided it was much less trouble and not much more time to just load the chambers by hand two at a time and press the rounds home.

But who knows, your experience with your gun and your ammo might be better than mine. Good luck with it!
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Old 10-29-2016, 11:44 AM   #3
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personally I c no use for any 22 revolver other than pure entertainment- I don't care how you slice it an auto is always going to be faster unless you're a sfb magazine dropper- and I do long range revolver too
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Old 10-29-2016, 02:13 PM   #4
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personally I c no use for any 22 revolver other than pure entertainment
No other reason is needed, my friend!
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Old 10-30-2016, 05:06 AM   #5
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Until this moment, it had never occurred to me to use the words ".22 revolver" and "speed loader" in the same sentence. But this got me thinking and, sure enough, they make Quickstrips for rimfires.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/61...ack-of-2-black

These might make a good alternative to Snake's hand loading and still provide the opportunity to press rounds home.

At eight bucks for two, I'd probably buy them. But then I'd have to buy a .22 revolver.
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Old 10-30-2016, 05:29 AM   #6
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I have a 6 shot Ruger SP-101 in .22LR, I'm quite pleased with it. There are speed loaders out there, but they have been out of stock, when I thought about it.

Geoff
Who has a similar Ruger Security six in .357 /.38Special, for which I have speed loaders.
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Old 10-30-2016, 05:29 AM   #7
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Speed loaders for 10 shot .22 revolvers go together like redheads and halter tops. .22 rounds are small and easy to fumble. Along with the fact of having to handle 10 of them every time you reload, which is very clumsy to say the least. Especially if you're going to be shooting hundreds of rounds in the course of an afternoon. Which is very easy to do when shooting ANY type of .22 firearm.

The fact the chambers may become dirty, and the rounds won't drop all the way in isn't an issue. When you release the loader, the downward force will push them most of the way in. Revolving your thumb or finger once around the cartridges will seat them all the way. Close the cylinder and you're ready to go. It all takes just a few seconds. No matter how you look at it, it's much faster and easier to reload.
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Old 10-30-2016, 07:26 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by billt View Post
Speed loaders for 10 shot .22 revolvers go together like redheads and halter tops. .22 rounds are small and easy to fumble. Along with the fact of having to handle 10 of them every time you reload, which is very clumsy to say the least. Especially if you're going to be shooting hundreds of rounds in the course of an afternoon. Which is very easy to do when shooting ANY type of .22 firearm.

The fact the chambers may become dirty, and the rounds won't drop all the way in isn't an issue. When you release the loader, the downward force will push them most of the way in. Revolving your thumb or finger once around the cartridges will seat them all the way. Close the cylinder and you're ready to go. It all takes just a few seconds. No matter how you look at it, it's much faster and easier to reload.
I have a little Velcro-secured "22 pouch" by Michaels of Oregon that I wear on my belt when shooting .22, especially revolvers. I think it holds about 100 rounds. I've gotten VERY good at reaching into that thing, grabbing two .22s by their base ends, and jamming them into the cylinder. Repeat as necessary.

I've often thought that in a 60-round race between me and my K22 and a guy with a Ruger autoloader and ONE magazine, starting with both guns (and the magazine) empty, I could get the 60 rounds out quicker. Let him start with the magazine full and he might be able to beat me. Maybe.

Two more points:

1. You're having to spend time and effort loading your speedloader rig, so you're really not saving any time, unless you're doing it in front of the TV or something and that's all the ammo you plan to shoot on that trip to the range. (I have a bunch of 10/22 banana mags and often load them up while watching TV.)

2. Guess which is more convenient for a walk in the woods, my pouch or your speedloader toolbox?

Seriously, though, if YOU like the thing, and it works for YOU, that's all that matters, isn't it?
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Old 11-01-2016, 01:50 PM   #9
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RUGER GP-100 RANGE REPORT

This morning I loaded up my new Ruger GP-100, along with my new speedloader set up for it, and headed out to the range early. I put over 400 rounds of Winchester Super-X High Velocity through it total. This ammo was 1980's vintage that I had stockpiled through the years. All of it performed flawlessly, with not a single misfire. Primer strikes were nice and deep. None were shallow.

It took me a while to get the sights dialed in. Mostly because I wasn't used to them. But after a couple of cylinder full's, the gun was printing beautifully with a 6 o'clock hold at 25 yards. Wind was dead calm. The one thing about this revolver, is you must keep the area under the ejector star clean. The slightest bit of powder, dirt, or fouling will make the cylinder difficult to shut. I had a little can of that compressed "computer air" with me, which worked great for blasting clean the area under the ejector star.

The Speed Beez speedloader set up worked flawlessly. It makes loading 10 rounds effortless, and can be done in seconds. I actually took a break after 60 rounds or so because the gun was getting warm from the constant shooting. The trigger on this gun is beautiful in single action. Let off was nice and crisp at around 4 pounds. The double action pull was VERY HEAVY. It did lighten up a bit after around 250 rounds. I'm sure the more I shoot this gun, the better it will get. But for the most part, if you want to achieve any good accuracy with this revolver, it will be in single action.

My only complaint was I wish the hammer spur was arched a little more. My thumb hit the back end of it instead of feeling the entire checkered spur itself. But it really isn't too bad. After over 400 rounds there was no line in the cylinder from the bolt dragging. The gun is timed beautifully. The cylinder locked up bank vault tight on every chamber.

After I shot several targets at 25 yards, I went over to the rifle range and had at some steel gongs at 100 yards. I had no trouble hitting 12" gongs at that distance. I held just a bit above the top of the gong, and was getting boringly consistent hits. The gun is very accurate overall. But it isn't what I would call "target grade". I felt the fiber optic front sight is a bit large. It almost completely covered a 6" bull at 25 yards. I would prefer a red ramp blade front with the white outline rear. Much like the old Smith & Wesson Model 29's had. At least that's what I'm used to. I'm sure I'll get used to these sights after a few hundred more rounds.

All in all I'm very happy with this gun. Ruger built this thing to last. I highly doubt anyone could possibly wear one of these GP-100 .22's out in a lifetime of shooting. I think it will take at least 1,000 rounds or more to get this gun properly broken in. It's getting smoother the more I shoot it. As you can imagine, the gun was filthy after I got it home. I went to work with some Hoppe's #9 and a toothbrush, and it cleaned up quickly and easily. I gave it a good "wash" in clean Kerosene, followed by a good blow drying with compressed air, and it was spotless. Then a good oiling, and she's ready to go again. I used "Lead Away Wipes" to remove all the dirt and burn marks from the front of the cylinder and barrel face. It cleaned it right up. I'm looking forward to shooting this gun again. It's really a blast to shoot!
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Old 11-01-2016, 02:26 PM   #10
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Great report, thanks for sharing all that with us!

Quote:
Originally Posted by billt View Post
RUGER GP-100 RANGE REPORT
The one thing about this revolver, is you must keep the area under the ejector star clean. The slightest bit of powder, dirt, or fouling will make the cylinder difficult to shut. I had a little can of that compressed "computer air" with me, which worked great for blasting clean the area under the ejector star.
It's not just your gun. It's every .22 DA revolver I've ever shot, including my own five. I carry a little collapsable travel/camp toothbrush whenever I'm shooting any of mine, to brush out under the star. Depending on the ammo, this is necessary every 60 to 120 rounds, and it MUST be done.

I also keep a USGI M16 5.56 bore brush handy, mounted on the handle section of an old M16 cleaning rod. One quick pass with that thing every so often cleans the ick out of the chambers most rikki-tik!

Welcome to the Wonderful World of .22 Revolvers. I wish you and I could shoot them together sometime.
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Old 11-03-2016, 09:11 AM   #11
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I've often thought that in a 60-round race between me and my K22 and a guy with a Ruger autoloader and ONE magazine, starting with both guns (and the magazine) empty, I could get the 60 rounds out quicker. Let him start with the magazine full and he might be able to beat me. Maybe.
Snake...Scientifically confirmed!!

My best friend and I had EXACTLY that discussion, so we put it to the test. I was armed with a S&W 10 shot 617, and he had a 10 shot S&W 422 with one magazine. We decided to see who could empty 30 rounds faster, and I beat him. Not a big margin, he's pretty good at loading that magazine, but I did win.
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Old 11-03-2016, 10:04 AM   #12
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Biillt

Great report, so happy you're happy. If you’re anything like me, that gun will quickly become one of your favorites…

So I have the S&W version, the 10 shot 4" 617, and I have to say it has become my all time favorite handgun. No matter what, if I'm going out shooting, that is one gun that is ALWAYS going with me. I've had the gun for just about 15 years now. It has had easily 30k rounds through it in that time, and conservatively 3x that in dry snaps. I'm happy to report that I have never had even the slightest issue with it, accuracy remains excellent, and she even looks great after all that abuse.

My 617 has match chambers, and I suspect your GP-100 does as well; but I hope it doesn’t. Honestly that's the one thing I would change on my S&W. Sure I'd be giving up some accuracy, but it doesn't take but a couple of cylinders and you have to start pressing rounds into the chamber from powder/lead buildup at the chamber mouth. I think S&W does the match chambers as a case of "well that's the way we've always done it". But the K-22 is no longer their flagship match .22, nor is it even close to competitive in today's world of target autos. When I compared the 617 to a S&W model 41, the model 41 was just shy of cutting groups in half. And the 617 is an accurate revolver, it's just that the best target auto's really are THAT MUCH more accurate. And the current K-22's, while quite accurate, just aren't as accurate as those of old by about 10%-15% (my observations of shooting the 617 against old K-22's over the years), so why be a pretender to something it’s not?

My K22 is more than sufficiently accurate, but I consider it more of a fun gun than a serious target revolver. And even if you gave up some accuracy for the convenience and functionality of standard chambers, I think the revolver would still be adequately accurate for anything you could ask of it, yet it would become even more user friendly, and just that much more fun.

What I love about my full sized .22lr revolver is what a great training aid it is for my centerfire DA revolvers. In today’s world of auto pistols ruling the world of defense, the mastering of a DA revolver is becoming a very RARE thing indeed. I take pride in the fact that I can still shoot a DA revolver with the same level of proficiency as most of my single action autos. Even though I’m a gunsmith and it’s really nothing for me to do action tuning on my revolver, I have kept the 617 in stock condition as an aid to training. The out of the box action is very smooth due to the use of MIM hammer & trigger, but the springs are predictably a bit on the stiff side. But I keep it that way to keep my trigger finger strong, and as an additional challenge with the mindset of, if I can shoot my 617 accurately in DA, then I can shoot any DA revolver accurately.

I really love how Ruger has done their GP-100, because the way they set it up just makes SO much sense. The lighter profile barrel is MUCH more practical (IMO) than the full lugged heavy barrel of the S&W, making a 6” barrel as light or lighter than my 4”. Now Ruger is going to figure out that not making a 4” first is a mistake. American’s just LOVE 4” DA revolvers…but I expect they’ll figure that one out. Regarless, a 6” heavy barrel but without the full lug makes a LOT of sense, and makes for a great revolver to have on hand. 6” inch is still easy to carry, gives you noticeably better ballistics in the .22lr, and a longer sight radius. I actually like their choice of sights… I just don’t like the V notch & fiber optic setup on anything, but fiber optic front sights do work well in a number of scenarios, especially in the field or hunting. So going with the traditional notch and a FO front, which can easily be swapped for a ramp, Patridge, or colored ramp…that was just a good call.

I think the 10 shot GP-100 is a real winner, and I think you’re never going to sell that revolver.

Congratulations sir !
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Old 11-03-2016, 02:58 PM   #13
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Kevin, here are three of my .22 sixguns--Colt Diamondback, Colt Trooper, and Smith 17. Yes, 17, not 18. After they discontinued the M18 Combat Masterpiece, Smith continued to make 4" barrels available on K22s for a year or two. This is one of them. Notice that it has a full-width barrel, like a Model 19, instead of the tapered barrel of the M18. I have grown VERY fond of that gun.

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Old 11-03-2016, 04:50 PM   #14
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Snake,

Thatmodel 17 is off the charts cool. A friend of mine has the exact same gun in stainless, and according to him there was only 1000 of those made. It's a 617 6 shot.

I have always wanted an early I frame Trooper in .22lr...very cool revolvers you have there.
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Old 11-03-2016, 04:52 PM   #15
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Is that a Viking frame on the 2nd one from the left?
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Old 11-03-2016, 05:15 PM   #16
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Is that a Viking frame on the 2nd one from the left?
Good eye! Yup, ODI Viking, built by me from a kit that was remaindered out by Randco in the late '80s. The top half of the think was basically junk, and I never cared for how the DA worked, so I eventually put a Ciener Commander-length conversion on it, dropped the DA parts in a baggie for posterity and installed a leftover parts-box aluminum 1911 trigger. I let my son use it for a training gun and he ran I dunno how many thousands of rounds through it. So have I, come to think of it.

All three guns on the top row are Ciener conversions. They all work great! Ciener has the worst reputation for customer service in the Western Hemisphere--possibly in the whole universe--but I've never needed any--they all work just fine.

Last edited by Snake45; 11-03-2016 at 05:17 PM.
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