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-   -   Gas system maintenance on M1 Carbine? (https://gunhub.com/showthread.php?t=38039)

thebrow 10-09-2006 01:16 PM

All,

Thanks for the info. This is a ton of information and I now have a place to start. I need to guage my barrel as well and see if it is worn out or not. Do any of you know where I can find a barreled receiver for sale or do you have to buy them seperate? I am looking for a new barrel if I do this not a used one. This carbine is primarily a shooter with some small collectors interest as well.

Jared

Audie 10-09-2006 10:04 PM

CR...LOL...indeed, plasmas usually exist at temperatures on the order of that on the sun...millions of degrees. :shock:

Inland 1943 06-26-2015 02:08 PM

Gas piston and piston nut
 
M1 Carbine TM9-1276 Pages 72-73
REMOVING GAS PISTON AND PISTON NUT.
(1) The gas piston and piston nut are the only removable parts of the gas cylinder group.
To remove piston, clamp barrel firmly in a vise with protected jaws and, using the gas piston nut-removing tool M5, or gas piston holder and spanner wrench, unscrew the piston nut from gas cylinder. (See fig. 46.) Be careful not to bur or twist prongs on nut when removing (nut is staked in place) or piston will not move freely. (If piston nut or piston is tight, proceed as explained in par. 52a. Remove nut, elevate muzzle of barrel, and slide piston out of gas cylinder. If piston will not slide out, tap cylinder lightly with wooden block.
(2) The gas cylinder may be integral with the barrel or swaged on the barrel at manufacture. Do not remove the gas cylinder. If gas cylinder is unserviceable, send weapon to base shop for replacement of barrel assembly.
51. Inspection
a. GENERAL. Check assembly of barrel to receiver. Screw barrel into receiver tightly, with draw marks aligned. In this position, gas cylinder should be centrally located with regard to lower face of receiver, operating slide guide ways symmetrically located with regard to centerline of receiver, and extractor should not bind when bolt is assembled to weapon and operated. If extractor binds when barrel is in proper alignment, a damaged extractor is indicated. Check for parallelism between barrel and receiver, as explained in paragraph 52c.
b. GAS CYLINDER.
(1) Inspect gas cylinder for looseness (swaged on type), deformation, piston wear, burs, carbon, and rust. Inspect piston nut threads for wear and burs. Inspect gas port for foreign matter, using a 0.070-inch drill inserted by hand.
(2) Inspect piston for wear, burs, and carbon.
(3) Inspect piston nut for loose fit in gas cylinder. Inspect threads and turning lugs for wear and burs. Inspect piston aperture for burs.
Piston should be an easy fit in aperture and extend, when in the rearward position, 0.175 (approximately 11/64) inch from the rear face of the nut. In forward position, piston should clear nut approximately 1/32 inch. When assembled, the gas cylinder should be staked very lightly into the nut in one of the three places provided, or nut may work loose during firing of the carbine.

CaptainGyro 06-27-2015 04:46 AM

Jared, do yourself a favor and just try different mags first.

My beautiful Winchester was nearly DOA when I bought it. A couple of knowledgeable guys I shoot with immediately suspected the mag (which appeared to be in great shape). New Korean mags from Wideners arrived shortly thereafter, and my girl is now unstoppable...couldn't make her hiccup if I tried.

Old dysfunctional carbine mags, by the way, make great fifty-yard targets.

TommyGunn 06-27-2015 05:54 AM

You do realize this is a nine year old thread?:ek:

CaptainGyro 06-27-2015 07:10 AM

Wow. No wonder I feel younger.

TommyGunn 06-27-2015 01:05 PM

:lol: That's one way to look at it! :thumbsup:

stand watie 06-27-2015 07:56 PM

Tommy Gunn,

Fyi, it's NEVER too late to have a SECOND CHILDHOOD.
(CHUCKLE)

yours, satx

TommyGunn 06-28-2015 07:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stand watie (Post 541869)
Tommy Gunn,

Fyi, it's NEVER too late to have a SECOND CHILDHOOD.
(CHUCKLE)

yours, satx

:thumbsup:
We are in agreement!
:mrgreen:
:bow::bow::bow::bow::bow::bow::bow::bow::bow:

IrishCop 06-28-2015 01:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stand watie (Post 541869)
Tommy Gunn,

Fyi, it's NEVER too late to have a SECOND CHILDHOOD.
(CHUCKLE)

yours, satx

My wife tells me I'm on my third...and she's usually right. :oops::)

bearcat6 06-28-2015 06:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IrishCop (Post 541873)
My wife tells me I'm on my third...and she's usually right. :oops::)

I'll bet she's always right. I know mine was.

csmkersh 06-28-2015 07:01 PM

As long as she's not in the diaper business again you're okay.

Captain O 10-05-2016 11:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inland44 (Post 344507)
And gas systems are not self-cleaning. Any gas-operated weapon will eventually fail to cycle if the gas system is not cleaned. Sounds good in theory but in practice carbon still forms, with or without oil present. Has no one ever seen a gas port cleaning tool in the AK-47 cleaning kit? It has been my experience that certain oils do not carbonize in the gas system and can liquify the firing residues that do form, so cleaning consists of just wiping with a soft cloth and re-treating. No gas system of mine ever needs scraping, drilling or other harsh treatment. This includes an AR-15 with it's very dirty and trouble-prone 'direct impingement' gas system, dumping firing residues right into the bolt carrier/bolt. This is the main weakness of the system and is why any gas piston system is inherently better. BTW, gas piston uppers are now available for the AR. The M1 Carbine's weakness is potential clogging of the gas transfer port and piston, and the possibility of rendering the gun useless in the attempt to remove and re-install the gas piston in the field. Although this weakness was not a major problem while the carbine was in service, it's become a problem now because he carbine, like any other military weapon, was not designed to be shot for 60 years without a major overhaul. Firing residues from foreign and hand-loaded ammunition and lead bullets has eventually blocked many carbine gas systems, requiring the gas piston to be pulled for manual cleaning of the gas port and piston chamber. As long as this is done by a competent person, there should be no problem, but many barrels have been ruined by cross-threading, over-tightening and failure to stake.

This is really how it is. clean things well, make certain that the gas system is dry... and I mean bone dry, that the gas nut isn't loose and you should be just fine. Winchester engineered it from Williams' short-stroke piston concept correctly from the outset. Properly maintained, it should work for many years.

Captain O 10-05-2016 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thebrow (Post 344819)
All,

Thanks for the info. This is a ton of information and I now have a place to start. I need to guage my barrel as well and see if it is worn out or not. Do any of you know where I can find a barreled receiver for sale or do you have to buy them seperate? I am looking for a new barrel if I do this not a used one. This carbine is primarily a shooter with some small collectors interest as well.

Jared

Fulton Armory has "bare bones" (stripped) receiver/barrel arrangements starting at $739.95 + shipping.

All the best

SpecialEd 10-05-2016 02:21 PM

What's with all the Necroposting? You realize that most of the people you are replying to haven't participated in years right?

Skeptic49 10-06-2016 01:33 PM

What, didn't you know Zombie threads are fashionable?
Geoff
Who catches up every so often.

TommyGunn 10-06-2016 02:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Skeptic49 (Post 559026)
What, didn't you know Zombie threads are fashionable?
Geoff
Who catches up every so often.

Just watch out for Negan.............:rolleyes:


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