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Old 08-23-2018, 04:48 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by stand watie View Post
To All,

ImVho, there is NO perfect survival knife.

yours, sw
So many have had such varied Survival experiences that any knife that has brought you through whatever your survival experience was, perhaps the knife that works at the time you need it most is the "Perfect Survival Knife."
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Old 08-23-2018, 05:11 PM   #22
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M118LR,

You may well be correct. = A TX Revolution memoir indicates that a militiaman (From near today's Athens, TX), on the way to join GEN Houston's forces used a broken draw-knife & "a convenient rock" to kill a Mexican officer, who was napping near a creek at the time.
The militiaman took the Mexican officer's clothes/horse/tack/weapons/money & later arrived in Houston's camp much better-supplied than most of the TX Militia ever were.
(Our little rag-tag Texas Revolutionary Army had MANY men, who arrived at Houston's camp unarmed, with nothing but the clothes on their back, often bare-footed & "riding shank's mare". = The VAST majority of TX settlers were "dirt poor", when they arrived in Texas-Coahuila. NOT a few were also "fleeing unfortunate circumstances", back in the USA.)
His memoir indicates that the veteran completed his militia service in The Battle of San Jacinto.

Thus, I guess that a broken piece of draw-knife was an effective "survival weapon" in that case.

ADDENDA: In another case, an East Texas volunteer, who had walked from what is today's Panola County, arrived in Houston's camp in what another TX soldier's letter home to his wife indicated was, "- - - - rags that hardly covered his nakedness. Before that night ended, he had been given moccasins, a felt hat & sufficient clothing to cover himself against the night's coldness. At dawn on the third day he had a musket & kit from the camp's stores."
(Our little Revolution was truly a "come as you are war". Further, my research indicates that less than a DOZEN Texas soldiers had any previous military training & most of those had only fought skirmishes with Amer-Indians.)

yours, sw

Last edited by stand watie; 08-23-2018 at 09:09 PM. Reason: add/typos
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Old 08-24-2018, 02:21 PM   #23
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OK, you all made me go digging in the basement for that box...you know, the one we've all got packed away someplace with the flotsam from our military days. Well, I was able to find my old 499, along with my smaller, far more utilitarian survival tool that we all dangled on the chain with our dog tags. You may be able to see that my 499 is stamped "ONTARIO 1-1973".

As you can also see, the holes in the hand guard don't appear to be unique to the Navy. Those, along with the holes at top and bottom of the sheath, appear to be universal.



In the same big box I found this smaller one with all my patches and ID tags. I also found a nostalgic reminder that there was a time when really mediocre cigars could be had four for a dollar, tax included.


Last edited by CaptainGyro; 08-24-2018 at 02:34 PM. Reason: resize photos
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Old 08-24-2018, 03:11 PM   #24
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Captain Gyro,

I'd bet that that little box brings back many memories.
(My little wooden box was destroyed by fire about 15 years ago & I miss those "bits & pieces".)

yours, sw
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Old 08-24-2018, 03:19 PM   #25
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Captain Gyro,

My P38 is on my key chain. For a long time I wore my dog tags any time I flew. About a year before ('86) the Army sent down a directory stating we were to wear them even on commercial aircraft and in civies. A few months earlier a plane went down and they had Hell identifying over 200 DBs because no one was wearing their tags.
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Old 08-25-2018, 06:29 PM   #26
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Capt, I'm not going into that cheap paper cigar box. Yes it's there somewhere, but forgotten patches and decorations are just that. Forgotten! But I well recall those moments. (mine may be hidden in a Bering Box) Yet todays MRE's don't need a tl-38 to open.

But the 499 still ranks as one of the best actual survival knifes from a realistic perspective that i've ever handled. It may not be unique to the Navy, but somehow it still seems to be the frontline issue of the Navy?

Perhaps the Navy lags behind modern technology, or is good enough good enough?
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Old 08-26-2018, 03:26 AM   #27
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SW: Yeah, the memories in that little box are pretty dear...I'm sorry yours was lost.

Top: You speak of the Gander crash, which I well remember. It was a sickening tragedy.
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Old 08-26-2018, 06:23 AM   #28
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M118LR, I hate MREs and have been retired longer than you were in. I carry my P38 because when the Wife and I travel by POV we always pack food and drinks. It often comes in handy then.
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Old 08-26-2018, 08:46 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by csmkersh View Post
Captain Gyro,

My P38 is on my key chain. For a long time I wore my dog tags any time I flew. About a year before ('86) the Army sent down a directory stating we were to wear them even on commercial aircraft and in civies. A few months earlier a plane went down and they had Hell identifying over 200 DBs because no one was wearing their tags.
I'm just barely old enough to remember when surplus stores had big glass jars of P38s by the cash register, the way some places have candy or gum balls. You could take your change in P38s, if you wanted.
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Old 08-27-2018, 10:10 AM   #30
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M118LR, I hate MREs and have been retired longer than you were in. I carry my P38 because when the Wife and I travel by POV we always pack food and drinks. It often comes in handy then.
Well, the P38 sure comes in handy when the silly little tabs break opening canned meats etc...kind of Hurricane emergency must have item...even works on a dark electricless night, as long as the winds are low enough that you can keep it in hand. LOL.

You really got to be Old, (LOL) I got over 20 years in the Fleet Reserve.

Last edited by M118LR; 08-27-2018 at 10:13 AM. Reason: Old Age.
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Old 08-27-2018, 10:49 AM   #31
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You really got to be Old, (LOL) I got over 20 years in the Fleet Reserve.
That I am. I retired in 1987 after 31. BPED was 29 Oct 1956.
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Old 08-27-2018, 12:26 PM   #32
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csmkersh,

And you were 17YO on BPED??

yours, sw
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Old 08-27-2018, 12:43 PM   #33
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To All,

Fwiw, we Mike Papas call MRE: MEALS REJECTED BY ETHIOPIANS, as starving people there went hungry rather than eat MRE during the famine there.

yours, sw
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Old 08-27-2018, 12:56 PM   #34
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No, I merely got tired of waiting for the draft and enlisted. Wound up with an 11B MOS was designated one of they units truck drivers and was "given" a REO deuce and a half and decided that sure beat walking. After being promoted to CPL, I was placed in a "typing school" the unit had and then moved to a 71L10 slot with additional duty as armorer. That beat motor pool duty keeping my deuce happy. Then I made buck sergeant and started up the NCO ranks even though the Captain kept pestering my to apply of OCS. I had already seen that some 2LTs came back perfect A-holes and said no. Best job was 1st SGT. I had daily contact with every enlisted and did my damnedest to see that after the mission, they came first. Paid off in good moral and guess that's how I would up in Operations. Got designated unit motor officer but the flag unit we answered to said no, Kersh hadn't been to school for that and they pushed an admin type Warrant off on us as motor officer and he found a desk in the S1 and never found his was to the motor pool. I said, F*** it, handed him the keys and went back to Operations and the Old Man told the XO to leave me alone as he felt I had been jacked around enough. From operations sergeant I was moved to the Sergeant major slot and was very surprised with the promotion came through. Five years later I was transferred to a CSM slot and was very surprised when DA approved my appointment to CSM. That was 1982. Five years later I told them I was tired of being on the road going to subordinate units on visits and/or command inspections and told them I was done.
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Old 08-27-2018, 01:22 PM   #35
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Some of the miscellaneous training I got was Spanish language as the unit had been tagged to maybe go to Central America. We got lucky and went to Germany instead. That was during the time troops weren't allowed to wear uniforms down there. I've seen news pics of a GI hoofing it down the road in civies and his 16 at low ready.

If I were in today and did half the things I did routinely then I might do a tour at Leavenworth.
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Old 08-27-2018, 06:02 PM   #36
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Some of the miscellaneous training I got was Spanish language as the unit had been tagged to maybe go to Central America. We got lucky and went to Germany instead. That was during the time troops weren't allowed to wear uniforms down there. I've seen news pics of a GI hoofing it down the road in civies and his 16 at low ready.

If I were in today and did half the things I did routinely then I might do a tour at Leavenworth.
Sounds like you had a long & distinguished career, Sir. (I tip my cap to you)
We even had a couple of decades with both of us inservice. Seems like I'm going to dip into that Bering Cigar box of lost memories. Wonder if we ever shared time in theater?

Igloo White,Frequent Wind, Cyclone, Eagle Claw, Dorado Canyon, Contra?

I'm pretty sure you didn't get the opportunity to play in Just Cause,Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Southern Watch, Restore Hope, and Deliberate since they came after the end of your watch.

Thank You for your service.
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Old 08-27-2018, 06:44 PM   #37
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I'm pretty sure you didn't get the opportunity to play in Just Cause,Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Southern Watch, Restore Hope, and Deliberate since they came after the end of your watch.
No, but one of my sons did. Mark, the middle son, was one of the first 10 Americans into Macedonia then later into Kuwait with the 101st. He said the lead tanks had blades like a dozer and at first just plowed the idiots under. When they realized all the Iraqis wanted to do was surrender they told them to just march South with their weapons either over their heads or on the ground.

Young son, Steve, was a enlisted tank driver, managed to go to the prep school for the Point then made selection for West Point. Learned to helicopters at Fort Rucker then PCS to Korea. Paid for his time at the Point, resigned his commission and came home just in time to miss the hunt for Bin Laudin. Both are pfcs now working as software contractors for the Army.

Operation Cyclone was made into a movie, Charlie Wilson's War IIRC. He was a Texas Congressman that manage to get money funneled to the CIA for their fun and games in Afghanistan.
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Old 08-28-2018, 01:54 PM   #38
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According to Hollywood every Military Operation from 1946 to the present is part of a CIA conspiracy. Only time I met Osama Bin Laden was when we delivered some large crates marked "Bibles". He was part of the mujahideen fighting against Russia. Perhaps the alphabet companies shouldn't have shown them how to make an airburst with a RPG? (But that's just hindsight from Mogadishu.) It seems that American made "Stinger's" worked well on Russian made Helo's.

Thing 1 (Baby Boats) served a tour as a Carrier Based Blue Water Sailor during Iran. Thing 2's Soldier Spouse is still a currently serving I/A Veteran (4 I/A deployments + 18 months in Korea) who is making a lifestyle change at Fort Huachuca now that he's starting his 4 th hitch. Guess us Old Service Dawg's tend to breed future Warriors, wouldn't it be great if someday America wouldn't have to send it's best off to War?
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Old 08-28-2018, 02:22 PM   #39
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Fort Huachuca is a good post. Your 60 miles from Nogales (Walnuts) and about 60 miles from Tucson. It's been years but El Corral had the best prime rib streak to be found. I can't remember the name of the Mexican restaurant near the dog track.
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Old 08-29-2018, 06:12 PM   #40
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Fort Huachuca is a good post. Your 60 miles from Nogales (Walnuts) and about 60 miles from Tucson.
Don't know that I'm going to get the chance to visit, it's just a Training Command for him. Expect that he will end up at MacDill AFB or someplace comparable. (MI)
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