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Old 10-19-2006, 08:18 AM   #1
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Home Parkerizing

Shooters Solutions advertizes a Heavy Duty Parkerizing Kit. Has anyone any experience with this? How does it come out? Or, is it like most of the home blueing kits, spoty and a lack of depth?
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Old 10-19-2006, 10:50 AM   #2
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Parkerizing is not like bluing. A great deal of how your park job will turn out will depend on several factors, some out of your control, some not.

First, the hardness and porosity of the metal. Garands with annealed heals will typically come out of a parkerizing solution distinctly two toned, dark gray and black. Spot hardened metals will also park differently on the hardened area than on the unhardened areas. But not always. Evenly hardened parts will typically come out evenly parked if preped properly and some parts will come out charcoal black while others will be a meduim to dark gray.

Second, the preparation of the solution is important. A solution that is not properly "aged" by suspending a biscuit of steel wool in it while maintained at parkerizing temps for about an hour will not parkerize well. A contaminated solution will also park poorly.

Third, and just as important is metal preparation. Sandblasting or bead blasting is best on used parts (the mfrs did not blast new parts before they were parked), although a long smooth barrel can be sanded to give the parkerizing more surface to penetrate. Degreasing is very important, too. After you clean and sandblast, you should avoid touching the bare metal as you will leave oils from your fingers on the metal. It is always a good idea to clean the bare metal with automotive break cleaner or acrylic laquer thinner. Both will dissolve and carry away any oils and dry without leaving a residue.

Fourth, some people "pickle" their parts in a solution of 10 to 20% of muriatic (hydrocloric) acid for a few minutes and then rinse them in hot water before they parkerize them. I have used the acid and I have not used it and I really can't tell the difference. Muriatic acid is available at hardware stores for cleaning masonry.

CAUTION: Do not mix muriatic acid in your parking solution or you will ruin the parts put in it.
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Old 10-19-2006, 11:18 AM   #3
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A most informative reply, thank you for your time.
I guess now all I need is an opinion: If you had three or four M1's to repark, it would be economically sound to DIY and with care taken to follow proper procedures, it is reasonable to expect a quality result?
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Old 10-19-2006, 12:14 PM   #4
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Before jumping in with both feet, why not try parkerizing on a smaller scale and see if it's for you? The first thing I ever parked was a #10 nail. All you really need to experiment with some small parts is a stainless steel sauce pan, a hot plate, a cooking thermometer, and a small bottle of Radocy zinc parkerizing concentrate. I most heartily recommend starting with zinc phosphate parkerizing. Zinc requires no aging or break in process, works at 170 degrees, and doesn't leave the residue in everything like manganese. Zinc phosphate gives a lighter gray finish than the manganese, but gives a more uniform coloring.

Here are a couple of M1's done in zinc:
[img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v483/JimScharf/Dscf0480.jpg[/img]

I have also had some luck darkening zinc phospated parts by dunking them in various oils. After parkerizing the parts go into a clear water rinse to get rid of the residual acid and are then usually compressed air blow dryed. After drying they must be oiled. Of the two receivers below, both were parkerized in Radocy zinc phosphate solution and dunked in different oils. Unlike the rifles above that were simply sprayed with a WD-40 type presevative, these were submerged in high sulfur thread cutting oils. The lighter receiver was soaked in high sulfur oil that contained no chlorine. The darker one was submerged for 24 hours in a high sulfer dark thread cutting oil that contains sulfur. This coloration does not rub off with normal gun cleaning solvents.
[img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v483/JimScharf/Dscf1645.jpg[/img]
[img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v483/JimScharf/Dscf1635.jpg[/img]

The most important thing in parkerizing is metal preparation. I bead blast everything with #10 glass beads, but I have an air compressor and a blasting cabinet. I have heard of others getting good results with degreasers and acids.

Manganese phosphate generally gives a darker finish, but is harder to work with. Temperatures are more critical as is surface perparation. I would only recommend manganese phosphate parkerizing after you are comfortable with the zinc. Manganese requires that the solution be aged at 140 degrees using powdered iron or steel wool for an hour before going on up to 190 degrees. It also leaves a build up inside your tanks and pans.

Here is an example of manganese parkerizing:
[img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v483/JimScharf/Dscf1509.jpg[/img]

Another example of manganese showing how dark it can get depending on the condition of your solution:
[img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v483/JimScharf/Dscf0785.jpg[/img]

For barreled receivers, barrels alone, and op-rods, you will need a tank. Here is a picture of my set up.
[img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v483/JimScharf/Dscf0517.jpg[/img]
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Old 10-19-2006, 12:20 PM   #5
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IMHO you need a blast cabinet for best results. for that, you need air.

unless foling around with this stuff is it's own reward for you (and it is to me) you should remember that SA. Inc. does a very nice job, fast and cheap.
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Old 10-19-2006, 01:59 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAS
The most important thing in parkerizing is metal preparation. I bead blast everything with #10 glass beads........
Manganese phosphate generally gives a darker finish, but is harder to work with. Temperatures are more critical as is surface perparation.

Another example of manganese showing how dark it can get depending on the condition of your solution:
[img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v483/JimScharf/Dscf0785.jpg[/img]

For barreled receivers, barrels alone, and op-rods, you will need a tank. Here is a picture of my set up.
You come up with a simple plan and someone wants to shoot holes in it!!! (just kidding, I appreciate the use of your experience)

It is my opinion that your second example of Manganese is what Jonn C. had in mind when invented the M1 and is what I'd like to aspire to. I do have some small experience with browning and rust blueing but my first thoughts about parkerizing came this afternoon while I was waiting out the rain so please forgive my seemingly idiotic questions. Your pan does not give the impression of being stainless, is it? It is necessarily stainless? I have a couple of compressors and sand blasting equipment and a couple of friends with bead blasting cabinets, that's a non issue. I have 3 stainless sink's from the dairy we no longer operate that could be made to work.
I've noticed that people won't mess with the paperwork to get a good service or field grade from CMP for 400 to 500 dollars, but they are more than willing to part with 800 to 900 for a ragged out rack grade that they can put their hands on. It is this propencitity that I intend to exploit to finance 3 projects: a J.C. Garand Match rifle, a National Match rifle and one of Fultons M1D reproductions. I figure a pass through the dishwasher, a bit of linseed oil and a decent Park Job on a good barrel should be worth it's weight in gold. I appreciate the help.
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Old 10-21-2006, 03:30 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delloro
IMHO you need a blast cabinet for best results. for that, you need air.

unless foling around with this stuff is it's own reward for you (and it is to me) you should remember that SA. Inc. does a very nice job, fast and cheap.
SA.Inc.? I'm not familiar with them, but "nice job, fast and cheap" sounds good. Who are they?
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Old 10-21-2006, 05:47 PM   #8
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Maybe a stupid question but how do you park a barrel and not park the inside?
Hippy
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Old 10-21-2006, 06:01 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hippy1969
Maybe a stupid question but how do you park a barrel and not park the inside?
Hippy
Plug the bore and breech with cork or rubber plugs
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Old 10-21-2006, 06:04 PM   #10
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Plug the muzzle and breach?
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Old 10-21-2006, 06:13 PM   #11
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Like I said probably a stupid question.
Hippy
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Old 10-21-2006, 06:18 PM   #12
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Neoprene rubber stoppers from any well supplied hardware store in the appropriate sizes will work to plug the chamber and muzzle. You must also block the gas port to prevent the solution from getting into the bore. I use top quality 3M electrician's tape in three tight layers over the gas port reinforced by two plastic cable ties. one on each side of the port. Wet the rubber stoppers with saliva and push them in firmly. I once had the rubber stopper pop out of the chamber after several minutes in the solution. I immediatly pulled the barrel from the solution and rinsed the bore with clear water. There was no damage.
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:53 AM   #13
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do any of you know how to mix a hand made solution from 98% phospheric and manganees dioxide? i canot find the ratios online and im lookin for a tip
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Old 02-14-2013, 08:07 AM   #14
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This thread on Cast Boolits should interest you.

"Kitchen Stove Parkerizing" by Dick Culver (from the old jouster site) may help too!
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Old 02-20-2013, 09:29 AM   #15
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thanks for the tip
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Old 02-21-2013, 12:59 AM   #16
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OK, with the proliferation of "Spray On - Bake On" gun finishes, why take the risks of parkerization?

Geoff
Who used the park tank at Ft. Hood in the 1970s.
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Old 02-22-2013, 02:58 PM   #17
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One thing I didn't see mentioned was that parkerizing is a surface accretion: it builds up on the surfaces. If you've got tightly fitted parts before parking, you've now got really tightly fitted parts.

One uses parkerizing rather than paint for authenticity for older military pieces. Or, if you like the belt and suspenders approach, parkerize and then paint, like HK did/does.

BTW, for small stuff the ceramic coated steel (blue enamal with white specks look) cookpots of yesteryear do quite well-at least for the zinc phosphate finish.
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