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Old 01-01-2006, 06:36 PM   #1
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M1 trigger Housing

what the difference between an M2 and an M1 housing?
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Old 01-01-2006, 06:52 PM   #2
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Audie,

I presume you are talking about the trigger group housing.

This is just a guess, but I believe the original (M1) trigger housings weren't cut for the M2 disconnector arm (or whatever it is called), the pin of which runs through the front hole of the trigger guard and accomadates the selector on the left side of the pin. I think (again, purely speculation) that most of the original early trigger housings were milled, whereas many of the later were made from component plates. I have one older milled housing that is cut for a pin and in no way could ever accomodate the M2 parts. I think I have one or two later trigger housings somewhere around here that are made to take the M2 parts.

Forgive the speculation, but that is the best I can do. I hope someone else will come along and be more precise (and maybe more correct). It is a very good question you are asking.
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Old 01-01-2006, 06:56 PM   #3
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Makes sense. have any comparitive pics? also how many of these parts can one collect before you are in that fuzzy area of violating the vague laws on class III?
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Old 01-01-2006, 07:14 PM   #4
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Audie, the differences are slight. The right side of the rear wall of the mag well is milled away to provide clearance for the disconnector lever, and the left edge of the wall has two very small scallops cut into it for the round end of the "9" spring. Those are the only differences. The originals were all milled, but later conversions could be either milled or stamped and of any type.
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Old 01-01-2006, 07:29 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Audie
Makes sense. have any comparitive pics? also how many of these parts can one collect before you are in that fuzzy area of violating the vague laws on class III?
Alas, no pics. I am digitally deprived.

As for what you can own legally, I'll have to dig into my own archives to find an answer posted somewhere sometime ago on a forum far, far away, if someone else doesn't come up with the right answer first. I recall that it is okay to own an M2 oprod and trigger group if you own an M1. I believe the hammer, sear, and disconnector are not kosher, though. It goes without saying that if you possess all of the M2 parts without the appropriate governmental imprimatur, you are playing a risky game.

Again, I am operating from vague and impaired memory. I am far from an expert on firearms law. And I haven't bought any carbine parts in many years, so I may be ill-informed.

Again, you are asking a very interesting question that should be of concern to anyone who collects carbine parts. I hope we get a definitive answer.
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Old 01-02-2006, 05:50 AM   #6
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Under FEDERAL LAW, you can own all but one part. And it doesn't matter which one, as long as it isn't a complete set. However; I would not like to test that. But many parts dealers do. They will seel every part except one in order to avoid being charged with selling machine guns. Usually it is the hammer that they don't have.
I still would make sure I had a couple of parts missing just to avoid the tender mercies of an overzealous agent.
On the other hand, your state and local laws may and in many cases define a machinegun differently and may name specific parts as being regulated or banned. Therefore YOU need to know how your state and local define them.
As a former owner of full autos and a C&R holder, I'm pretty confident of this information. But it is always better to err on the side of caution.
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Old 01-02-2006, 06:22 AM   #7
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From my understanding, Jim is right. I sure hope it's legal to have an m2 sear, because I have a pile of them. It seems like every rebuilt carbine I've bought came with an m2 sear in it. I think they were pretty commonly used during rebuilds?
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Old 01-02-2006, 07:11 AM   #8
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Quag, M2 sears are original equipment in many of the late Inland and Winchester M1 carbines. They were interchangable so they were used. And the military used them in a huge number of rebuilds as well. That is one part that nobody needs to be concerned about (Unless they have all of the other M2 parts!).
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Old 01-02-2006, 07:42 AM   #9
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Thanks Jim. I didn't know that they might be correct for late Inland & Winchester carbines.
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Old 01-02-2006, 07:07 PM   #10
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Thanks for the info, gentlemen!

Here is something I found on another site a couple of years ago regarding M2 parts:

Someone's reply from the BATF:

"Mr.XXXX: Thank you for contacting our Website. Normally, we do not answer technical questions by e-mail, but the short answer is: the M2 sear,M2 slide, M2 stock, and M2 trigger housing are also used in semiautomatic M1 carbines and they are not "parts designed and intended to convert." The M2 conversion kit includes parts which are not used in a semiautomatic M1 carbine. These include (1) M2 hammer, (2) M2 selector, (3) M2 selector spring, (4) M2 disconnector, (5) M2 disconnector spring, (6) M2 disconnector spring plunger, (7) M2 disconnector lever assembly. If you should have any further questions, please call our Firearms Technology Branch on 202-927-7910 for assistance. Regards,"


I have no idea if this is correct, but it did sound reasonable. I thought it interesting. According to the previous posts and what is stated here, I was wrong about the possible illegality of the M2 sear. That does not surprise me at all, as I probably couldn't tell an M1 sear from an M2 sear.
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Old 01-02-2006, 07:18 PM   #11
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the M1 sear and M2 sear are quite different looking. It is oddly interesting that a government agency is giving a common sense answer to a question. Any part that cannot be used in an M1 is a machine gun part.

Yet I have seen disconnect levers for sale on ebay. I would love to have an M2, but my state does not allow it.
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