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Old 12-25-2015, 02:28 PM   #1
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Question A womens home protection weapon/what kind?

I have a niece who is looking for a home protection pistol (first gun) that would be just right. Nothing with too much recoil or messing with clips an working slides.....What are the women packing in the pajama drawer these days?....................thanks/ sonny:
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Old 12-25-2015, 05:31 PM   #2
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You've answered your own question but first... get thee/she to a range and get some training.
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Old 12-25-2015, 05:32 PM   #3
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Best option is to take her to a well stocked gun store and let her handle a few pistols and revolvers.
Let HER choose what feels right to her.

In a revolver, you can't go wrong with a S&W or Ruger.
In the S&W there are many models in the small "J" frame size, and in the medium "K" frame.
In Ruger the SP-101 or the new polymer framed revolvers are all good.

If you love her, don't bother with any foreign made revolver like a Taurus.
Even today they have too much history of problems.

As a strictly HOME defense revolver one of the S&W or Ruger's in a 3 inch barrel and rubber grips is about perfect.
Caliber in .38 Special or a .357 loaded with .38 Special ammo will do the job.
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Old 12-25-2015, 05:35 PM   #4
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sonnyboy,

WELCOME ABOARD & MERRY CHRISTMAS, too.

As some here know, I'm a longtime fan of the Colt's D-frame & S&W J & K frame revolvers in .38SPL.
for 3 reasons:
1. Any less powerful handgun is not powerful enough to stop a determined burglar/sex criminal/home invader
2. The .38SPL is PLENTY of power without too much recoil or muzzle-blast
and
3. MOST new shooters, including those who have never even touched a pistol, can be competent with a revolver within 2 days of coaching/range time.

yours, sw

Last edited by stand watie; 12-29-2015 at 08:11 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 12-27-2015, 07:34 AM   #5
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I had two female relatives ask me the same thing on Christmas.

I had no idea what to tell them.

The market has changed so much in the last decade, I really have no idea what's available. All my stuff would, I guess, now be considered "classics" or "retro."

Best answer, I suppose, is visit several gun shops, look at and handle everything available, and if at all possible, shoot everything you can.

And then, whatever you buy, get some training and practice with the thing until you are completely comfortable and competent with it, or at the very least, until you are no longer more danger to yourself and others having it than not having it.
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Old 12-27-2015, 08:04 AM   #6
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38 special something or other- or 357- anything where they don't have to fight a spring or rack a slide- follow the kiss method and don't do the 5 beans in the wheel thing either- you might end up firing an empty chamber- remember , this is a PANIC situation and first out of the gate wins- and , for gods sake, PRACTICE= chances are you won't need anymore than 1 or 2 shots, but that's out of a cold barrel under stress- chances are the first shot will miss
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Old 12-27-2015, 10:20 AM   #7
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In my mind if you opt for the .38/.357 route the perfect gun is the S&W Model 13 with 4 inch heavy barrel. Oh, I'd personally would rather have the 3 inch model but hard to find. Realistically the S&W S&W 586 L-Comp might be a better choice. It's in production; the compensated barrel would help keeping the barrel down in recoil.

Normally I recommend the first handgun to be a .22 caliber, either pistol or revolver because of the reduced recoil and how much more practice ammo you can afford compared to the .38 Specials.
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Old 12-27-2015, 10:39 AM   #8
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+1 to the gents above, the best help you can give is exposure to different platforms--have her try everything she can on for fit, and when she finds The One she'll know.

One big thing to look at is grip angle--because of it some weapons don't fit some wrists. You want a bore axis that parallels a pointed index finger--accurate aim is much easier when the weapon already points like a natural extension of the arm.

Have her stretch her arm straight out with index finger pointing straight forward, take a drawing compass, put one arm down the palm of her hand where a grip's centerline would be and the other paralleling her index finger, then measure the angle.

For examples, admittedly these are autoloaders...
--Uzi: 90 deg on the nose
--Beretta 92/96/M9: near 90 deg
--1911: 85 deg
--Glock: 75 deg
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Old 12-27-2015, 02:52 PM   #9
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forget the 22 for home defense- for training , yes, but for home defense NEVER- buy a brick- not just a few boxes ,a BRICK- 550-1000 rounds AND COUNT THE NUMBER OF MISFIRES and ftfs you get- that's why everyone that has any brains at all goes centre fire- I use a 22 neos in competition and i'm a well accomplished shooter- in defensive mode, the mind may be able to pull and it will be a pull- that trigger once and the mental delay between first and second shots may be deadly -as the old Israeli
saying goes "bang bang- 2 shots -never bang" the point being to overcome that mental barrier leading to the second shot
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Old 12-27-2015, 03:36 PM   #10
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Comfortable .38 (To her personal grip and feel) loaded with Nyclads* if you can find them, and practice, practice, practice. Training ammo available cheap (relatively) in bulk. Can't go wrong.

*A.K.A. The "Chief's Special Load."

Good news - Federal has it!

http://www.federalpremium.com/produc...un.aspx?id=828
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Old 12-27-2015, 04:00 PM   #11
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Does it have to be a handgun? A shotgun comes to mind.
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Old 12-27-2015, 04:22 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t-star View Post
forget the 22 for home defense- for training , yes, but for home defense NEVER- buy a brick- not just a few boxes ,a BRICK- 550-1000 rounds AND COUNT THE NUMBER OF MISFIRES and ftfs you get- that's why everyone that has any brains at all goes centre fire- I use a 22
Worst ammo I've ever seen for this was bulk-packed Remington Golden Bullets a few years back (haven't bought any in the last 4-5 years so don't know what they're doing now). I kept careful track of them and after shooting up about 20K of them, found I'd had a FTF rate of between one and two percent, i.e. between five and ten FTFs in a box of 500. It was a real occasion when I could fire a complete 100 of them without a single failure. I think that only happened twice over the 20K.

That said, I wouldn't feel unarmed in my home with an 8, 9, or 10 shot .22 DA revolver. The DA revolver being the only kind of firearm that doesn't require either feeding or firing (or ejection) in order for the next round to be ready to go.
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Old 12-27-2015, 11:24 PM   #13
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My first choice is a S&W Model 15 .38 or the Model 66 in stainless.
Are the old FBI loads still available for .38 Special +P?

I know a woman who has the same K frame in .32 H&R Magnum and loves everything about it but paying for ammo.
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Old 12-28-2015, 04:14 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snake45 View Post
Worst ammo I've ever seen for this was bulk-packed Remington Golden Bullets a few years back (haven't bought any in the last 4-5 years so don't know what they're doing now). I kept careful track of them and after shooting up about 20K of them, found I'd had a FTF rate of between one and two percent, i.e. between five and ten FTFs in a box of 500. It was a real occasion when I could fire a complete 100 of them without a single failure. I think that only happened twice over the 20K.

That said, I wouldn't feel unarmed in my home with an 8, 9, or 10 shot .22 DA revolver. The DA revolver being the only kind of firearm that doesn't require either feeding or firing (or ejection) in order for the next round to be ready to go.
you're discounting the fact that you're PRACTISED and FAMILIAR with that gun- we're talking , in most cases, an unfamiliar absolute rookie- my better half( if you can call her that) refers to hers as that "thing' AND IT HAS STAYED IN THE DRAWER ever since- you CANNOT put yourself in those shoes-the first time that happened , I did the getting up and pulled my old 1911 from a holster - I keep a sea bag jic- charged it and went into col Mortimer mode - this freaked her out as she didn't now my background- or that I had it- anyway, it turned out to be nothing but her hysterics- and that's where my opinion comes from
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Old 12-28-2015, 04:20 AM   #15
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Does it have to be a handgun? A shotgun comes to mind.
yes, a shotgun typically requires going and getting, and the SIZE of the thing is frightening to most females- and it requires typically cocking or charging, and that's hard to do under stress- and who keeps a single or double LOADED at home?
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Old 12-28-2015, 04:56 AM   #16
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you're discounting the fact that you're PRACTISED and FAMILIAR with that gun- we're talking , in most cases, an unfamiliar absolute rookie
Well, you're going to have that problem with ANY kind of gun. The DA revolver is probably the hardest kind of handgun to shoot really well, but probably the easiest type to shoot AT ALL, especially under stress.

In other words, I believe I could get an untrained, semi-interested person competent to hit somewhere in the COM area of a human target at 10-15 feet with a DA revolver--and leave her with a retainable degree of that skill--easier than with any other type.
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Old 12-28-2015, 07:41 AM   #17
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Quote:
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yes, a shotgun typically requires going and getting,
As opposed to fetching the handgun from "the pajama drawer?"

Quote:
Originally Posted by t-star View Post
and who keeps a single or double LOADED at home?
Really? You may be surprised. (The previous statement is in no way an endorsement of the practice).
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Old 12-28-2015, 09:06 AM   #18
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SpecialEd,

Presuming that you have no children in the home, keeping a loaded pump or double-barrel shotgun quickly available is a GOOD THING, imvHo.
(Home invasions in this area are all too common & more than once a day an armed householder here in The Alamo City STOPS an armed home invasion with a firearm.)

In Bexar County, it is estimated that more than HALF of all households has at least one firearm in the home & most of those homes have at least one shotgun.
(Btw, Bexar County's population is about 1.9 Million with about 1.4 million persons, who reside in the City of San Antonio.)

A few facts, gathered from one of our county's LE agencies:
1. In 2015 the majority of home invasions & "night prowling" cases that are reported to police are estimated to be by armed criminals.
2. Well over 70% of home invasions occur between dusk & dawn.
3. Nearly 2/3 of APPREHENDED prowlers & armed intruders are under the influence of a chemical substance.
4. Nearly 1/3 of all APPREHENDED intruders have at least one previous conviction for theft or a felony crime & more than HALF of that 1/3 have 2 or more convictions.
5. Well over 80% of all home invasions end without an exchange of gunfire & with the criminal fleeing the premises.
and
6. Police response times vary so much by location throughout the county that NO meaningful "911 call to first police unit arrival time" can be determined with precision but anecdotal information is that most police response times are about 15-20 minutes.
(Any number of "unlawful & dangerous events" can occur in 15 minutes.)

General comments:
1. A study done at the Texas Department of Corrections in 2012 indicates that inmates are MORE frightened a an armed civilian being present at a crime scene than they are of "coming in contact with" the police.
2. More than 60% of incarcerated felons in the custody of TDC are serving another sentence for the same or a very similar felony that they had previously been convicted of.
3. More than 75% of incarcerated persons have at least 4 previous apprehensions for crimes, for which they could have been convicted of a felony.
4. Most TDC inmates said that they were armed with a dangerous weapon during their most recent felony crime & they stated that they were willing to use a weapon to commit a crime and/or to attempt to escape.
5. As most armed criminals commit crimes during the hours of darkness, the armed person is unlikely to be able to see the sights on a handgun well enough to make a well-aimed shot.

For those reasons, our house has a loaded 12-gauge pump shotgun that can be reached within 2-3 minutes from any place in the house & all members of the household are able to acquire & competently use the shotgun.
(I keep a loaded shotgun available for the same reason that we have smoke alarms & fire extinguishers in the home & in all our vehicles.)

yours, sw

Last edited by stand watie; 12-28-2015 at 04:04 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 12-28-2015, 09:20 AM   #19
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firearms are a SECOND line of defense around here -the first is a PAIR of gsds - you just need utter the words "get him" and I don't keep them penned either
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Old 12-28-2015, 11:04 AM   #20
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I actually plan to work loaded and prepositioned coachguns into the decor when I finally get to break ground... just lift off the plaque or dismount from the door it's disguised as "handle" on.

Easier to take Mas's route and gun-proof the kids than kid-proof the guns...
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