Question for Steve Wenger - Gun Hub
Gun Hub

Go Back   Gun Hub > Gun Hub Forum > Gun Talk

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-19-2016, 10:41 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
csmkersh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 9,760
Question for Steve Wenger

Question for Steve Wenger.

Did you ever meet "Jelly" Bryce? I went back through your web site again and was surprised you mentioned him and also cover Cirillo's alternate sighting methods.

Yes, I realize that most here would have been kids if the ever met the man.

Last edited by csmkersh; 10-19-2016 at 12:43 PM.
csmkersh is offline  
Old 10-19-2016, 01:13 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
IrishCop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Decatur, Al
Posts: 2,562
That would be a story I'd like to hear.
IrishCop is offline  
Old 10-22-2016, 01:08 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
spwenger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Show Low AZ
Posts: 1,071
No, I Never Met...

Quote:
Originally Posted by csmkersh View Post
Question for Steve Wenger.

Did you ever meet "Jelly" Bryce? I went back through your web site again and was surprised you mentioned him and also cover Cirillo's alternate sighting methods.

Yes, I realize that most here would have been kids if the ever met the man.
...Jelly Bryce.

I did meet Rex Applegate when I was a child in Mexico City, then re-connected with him, in 1997. In fact, I was with him in the hospital in San Diego, just a few days before his death.

I did meet and interact with Jim Cirillo at a few ASLET seminars and had several phone conversations with him, while he was living in Panama City. I will always prize the inscription that he wrote to me in Guns, Bullets, and Gunfights but, like many others, I mostly prize the invaluable tactical lessons from him, whether they came directly or indirectly.

Last edited by spwenger; 10-22-2016 at 01:10 PM. Reason: Corrected misspelling.
spwenger is offline  
 
Old 10-22-2016, 01:39 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
csmkersh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 9,760
Quote:
Originally Posted by spwenger;560497I did meet and interact with Jim Cirillo at a few ASLET seminars and had several phone conversations with him, while he was living in Panama City. I will always prize the inscription that he wrote to me in [i
Guns, Bullets, and Gunfights[/i] but, like many others, I mostly prize the invaluable tactical lessons from him, whether they came directly or indirectly.
Panama City was a little further East than my folks place. You could hear the gunfire at Hurburt Field. Dad was stationed at Eglin Field at the time.

I've got a copy of Guns, Bullets, and Gunfights in my bookcase and have read it at least 3 times. Also have No Second Place Winner by Jordan. Didn't Jordan write for Shooting Times at one time?
csmkersh is offline  
Old 10-25-2016, 01:08 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
spwenger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Show Low AZ
Posts: 1,071
My Recollection...

Quote:
Originally Posted by csmkersh View Post
Also have No Second Place Winner by Jordan. Didn't Jordan write for Shooting Times at one time?
...is that Jordan wrote an occasional piece for Shooting Times, mostly as a counterpoint to Skeeter Skelton. In fact, he may have written those pieces during the times that Skeeter was ill.

I'll be happy to defer to better memories on this one.
spwenger is offline  
Old 10-25-2016, 02:19 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
csmkersh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 9,760
Skeeter Skelton was my favorite writer of the time, maybe because he, like me, was a Texican. His "Me and Joe" stories reminded me of my growing up in West Texas. Jordan and Elmer Keith were great too.

Had the good fortune to me Adolph Topperwein and Wes Kline. Kline never gained the recognition as a exhibition shooter as Topperwein but that be partly do to Ad's using Plinky, his wife in the show.
csmkersh is offline  
Old 10-25-2016, 03:42 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
spwenger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Show Low AZ
Posts: 1,071
If Memory Serves...

Quote:
Originally Posted by csmkersh View Post
Had the good fortune to me Adolph Topperwein and Wes Kline. Kline never gained the recognition as a exhibition shooter as Topperwein but that be partly do to Ad's using Plinky, his wife in the show.
...Topperwein was some sort of relative of Rex Applegate's and had some influence on the eventual development of his eponymous technique.
spwenger is offline  
Old 10-25-2016, 06:27 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
WaltGraham's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Shenandoah Valley
Posts: 3,461
I'm hoping "Plinky" doesn't mean what I think it does...

And I only met Cirillo once, at a SHOT show.

We had a nice chat during which he remarked: "That's a Rosen belt."

Pretty good eye.
WaltGraham is offline  
Old 10-25-2016, 06:45 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
csmkersh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 9,760
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaltGraham View Post
I'm hoping "Plinky" doesn't mean what I think it does...
Down here plinking has to do with shooting cans and bottles and with both the Topperweins aerial targets. That's the way Mrs. Topperwein got her nickname. Ad's specialty was "portraits" drawn with a .22 rifle.

csmkersh is offline  
Old 10-25-2016, 07:01 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
csmkersh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 9,760
Quote:
Originally Posted by spwenger View Post
...Topperwein was some sort of relative of Rex Applegate's and had some influence on the eventual development of his eponymous technique.
I thought that Sykes-Fairbain were the initial driving influence on Applegate. Didn't know Applegate and Topperwein had any connection.

I remember meeting Colonel Askins at the West Avenue Range here. Boy, what an abrasive SOB he was. But he was a old man by then. Wes Kline hated him as did a number of shooters who were at the 1937 National Matches. He had a .22 center fire built using a Mexican round, the Velo-Dog, and a .22 Colt Woodsman Target. Everyone else used a .32 Colt revolver and just couldn't handle timed and rapid like Askins' Woodsman.
csmkersh is offline  
Old 11-15-2016, 06:53 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
P. Marlowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by spwenger View Post
...Topperwein was some sort of relative of Rex Applegate's and had some influence on the eventual development of his eponymous technique.
Quote:
Originally Posted by csmkersh View Post
I thought that Sykes-Fairbain were the initial driving influence on Applegate. Didn't know Applegate and Topperwein had any connection.

I remember meeting Colonel Askins at the West Avenue Range here. Boy, what an abrasive SOB he was. But he was a old man by then. Wes Kline hated him as did a number of shooters who were at the 1937 National Matches. He had a .22 center fire built using a Mexican round, the Velo-Dog, and a .22 Colt Woodsman Target. Everyone else used a .32 Colt revolver and just couldn't handle timed and rapid like Askins' Woodsman.
The late Colonel Applegate might have had some relationship with the Topperweins (I not sure but my father-in-law, who was close friends with him, told me that he didn't think so and, in fact, he wasn't sure if the two had even met) but I believe the Exhibition (Trick) Shooter that he was related to was his Uncle, Gus Peret.

Peret was an amazingly talented man who sadly, never seems to make any of those "lists" we see from time-to-time about such historical performers. Maybe that's the price you pay for shooting for Peters and not Winchester!

The Colonel told me a bit about Peret over the years but he told my father-in-law a lot more regarding things like that, as they were always "visiting" in one way or another; trading stories and exploring new ideas and techniques.

"Uncle Gus" was Applegate's primary influence and pretty much his sole "instructor" (although "instructor" might be too formal a word when it comes to familial-oriented learning) for shooting (especially non-traditional and non-military-related shooting) until he came under the spell of equally famed "gun man" William Fairbairn (ultimately a Colonel himself), from whom he learned and derived a lot.

Colonel Applegate was an amazing man who never stopped learning or thinking and who, contrary to things I've seen written by people who didn't know him, never lived in the past. I treasured our friendship. I learned a lot from him and it was always great catching up with him; either in person or on the phone. He was always willing to answer any of my usually dumb questions and he spoke of things (even grizzly things) with the intelligence and the detachment of a skilled technician but also with the wonderment and the excitement of a man just a fraction of his age.

Lately, as I seem to be growing older by the minute, I can only hope that I do as well in the years ahead.

I hope you two gentlemen do not find my correction insulting but I just thought you might find this of interest. Have a good rest of the week.
P. Marlowe is offline  
Old 11-16-2016, 04:05 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
spwenger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Show Low AZ
Posts: 1,071
No Offense Taken...

Quote:
Originally Posted by P. Marlowe View Post

I hope you two gentlemen do not find my correction insulting but I just thought you might find this of interest. Have a good rest of the week.
...by me. I replied from years-old memory and failed to take the time to crack open any of Applegate's books.

I never take offense at any correction of facts.
spwenger is offline  
Old 11-16-2016, 04:37 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
spwenger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Show Low AZ
Posts: 1,071
By the Way...

...Applegate made the point that one of the departures that he made from the technique that he learned from Fairbairn - raising the outstretched gun arm "like a pump handle" - was the result of an unplanned stop in Deadwood SD.

When he realized that the train on which he was riding had stopped there, he got off and sought out what I recall as the local library. Inquiring as to any material on Wild Bill Hickok, the librarian found him a box of unsorted papers. In it, he found an unmailed letter in which Hickok had replied to an inquiry about his technique in gunfights. Again, relying solely on memory, Hickok had penned that he raised his pistol as an extension of his arm and fired just as it was pointed at his target.
spwenger is offline  
Old 11-16-2016, 05:47 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
csmkersh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 9,760
Quote:
Originally Posted by spwenger View Post
...by me. I replied from years-old memory and failed to take the time to crack open any of Applegate's books.

I never take offense at any correction of facts.
My thoughts too.

Thanks to the both of you for providing info on people I've admire many of my 80 some years.
csmkersh is offline  
Reply

  Gun Hub > Gun Hub Forum > Gun Talk

Thread Tools
Display Modes





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2002 - 2017 Gun Hub. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.