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Old 03-15-2017, 03:27 PM   #1
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Selecting competition pistol

Currently I am in the market for a competition pistol.

I have been using my HK VP9 which is a great gun but want to get a pistol dedicated to competition.

I will be shooting local IDPA and 3 gun matches with it. I prefer to keep the caliber 9mm, I am not interested in .40.

After reading through bunches of rule books, it looks like I can use either of the models I am looking at: Glock 34 or an STI DVC Limited.

I realize these are hugely on opposite ends of the price scale. If I go with the G34, I am looking at going with Taran Tactical to get all the modifications up front rather than start with a base and part it together. I could also get a standard 34 and add arts that I would like to change, Glock upgrades with the exception of milling slides and cutting barrels are not out of my realm of ability.

For the STI, I like the idea of getting a gun that I can easily grow into and don't have to go through several guns to get a highly competitive pistol.

Any suggestions for those of you who may have gone down this path already? I appreciate any helpful guidance and input.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:40 PM   #2
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Let me start with some background. Long ago, I not only shot competition (and still occasionally do). I built guns for people who did so at a high level. I also have 30+ years of LE instructor experience.

OK, if you're shooting competition to accumulate trophies, at some time in the future you'll need a dedicated competition gun. I'd advise a 1911 platform at that time.

Now then, since you're apparently starting out, the point you need to grasp is that the major difference between the guys getting trophies and the ones who don't has little or nothing to do with hardware. You can watch videos of Julie Goloski/Goleb where you not only see over her shoulder while she shoots at speed, but she'll walk you through the course and explain what and why she did as she did. There are also classes by folks who compete at high levels that you could attend. Todd Jarrett does this among others. You can also talk to local folks who do very well, many gun people are very helpful to those starting out.

You need to work on running the current gun and learning how to choreograph your movements, eliminate errors and game the courses. When you're finishing in the top 10% or so of the competitors, and the 0.0XX seconds start to matter, then you're in the market for a high level competition gun. That's where the 1911 really pays off over Gaston's Glory in high round count matches.

I know that's probably not what you want to hear, but back in the day, I used to stomp a whole lot of people with $4K guns using either a (nearly) stock BHP or S&W 5906. Your best investment at this time is practice ammo and/or training.
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Old 03-16-2017, 06:32 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by William R. Moore View Post
Let me start with some background. Long ago, I not only shot competition (and still occasionally do). I built guns for people who did so at a high level. I also have 30+ years of LE instructor experience.

OK, if you're shooting competition to accumulate trophies, at some time in the future you'll need a dedicated competition gun. I'd advise a 1911 platform at that time.

Now then, since you're apparently starting out, the point you need to grasp is that the major difference between the guys getting trophies and the ones who don't has little or nothing to do with hardware. You can watch videos of Julie Goloski/Goleb where you not only see over her shoulder while she shoots at speed, but she'll walk you through the course and explain what and why she did as she did. There are also classes by folks who compete at high levels that you could attend. Todd Jarrett does this among others. You can also talk to local folks who do very well, many gun people are very helpful to those starting out.

You need to work on running the current gun and learning how to choreograph your movements, eliminate errors and game the courses. When you're finishing in the top 10% or so of the competitors, and the 0.0XX seconds start to matter, then you're in the market for a high level competition gun. That's where the 1911 really pays off over Gaston's Glory in high round count matches.

I know that's probably not what you want to hear, but back in the day, I used to stomp a whole lot of people with $4K guns using either a (nearly) stock BHP or S&W 5906. Your best investment at this time is practice ammo and/or training.
Thanks for the solid advice, I will sure put all you said into consideration. thanks a bunch.
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